Literature and food.


At the risk of sounding unlady-like, I will state for the record that I do love my food.

I also like trying out new and unusual dishes (except if it sounds too gross). I will also admit that I am somewhat impressionable when it comes to food, especially if I’m reading about it. What I mean is, if I’m reading a novel and the characters are eating something, I will suddenly have a craving for it or if it’s something strange I will want to try it out.

The constant mention of ‘gruel’ in many old Classics (think: Dickens) has frequently had me cooking up some oats even though it’s never given the most flattering of descriptions.

Now there have been some stranger concoctions that I’ve read and whether these are common where the author is from or whether they are made up, I can’t be certain exactly.

There is one favourite of mine that has raised a few eyebrows.

A few posts back I mentioned Elizabeth Kostova’s The Historian. The main character travels with her father through Europe. In one country(I can’t remember which) they purchased freshly baked rolls and stopped for a picnic/lunch were they ate the rolls with pieces of dark chocolate in them.
Chocolate on bread? Might sound weird but it is very tasty, people. The reason for Nutella’s existence- although there is a difference, in terms of taste, between choc spread and actual chocolate pieces. I prefer real chocolate pieces so if I have a slab of dark or milk choccie on hand and if I just bought some fresh white rolls, then you know exactly what I’m having for dinner. 🙂

Apples and cheese? Yeah, why not.

For the more health-conscious amongst us, I did come across a new dishy idea after reading the Hunger Games. In the arena, Katniss makes a meal with goats’ cheese and apple slices in a roll. True to my curiosity I decided to try this combination out.
I didn’t have goats’ cheese and since it’s not very common in the supermarkets in my hometown, I used Camembert instead. It was surprisingly good on wholewheat brown bread. I later read that Feta was very similar to goats’ cheese so I tried that as well. I didn’t like it very much, the apple and Camembert made a far better match so lo and behold! I’ve found a new favourite sandwich filling!
As a gourmand, nothing frustrates me more than completely made-up foods that the author makes sound so mouth-wateringly delicious, yet you will never truly know what it tastes like. One example for me was, the Island Of Purple Fruits by Terry Jones(yes, him of Monty Python fame) which describes the said fruits as being the tastiest thing that the main character had ever eaten. As a kid (and even now) I ached to know what those fruits tasted like that. And the same goes for Rowling’s Butterbeer.

Weird dishes/foods mentioned in works of fiction: have you ever been tempted to try them yourself? If you’re a writer have you ever created unique delicacies in your stories? Or what’s the tastiest-sounding foodstuff you ever read about in a novel? Your thoughts are always welcomed.

NM 🙂

A wonderful prezzie in the mailbox.


Staying in the spirit of a A Web-less Life, all I want to say is, I love the Internet. I really do. You meet such awesome people online that you think it a cruel irony that none of them live as close to you as you would like. Or if you’re an optimist you would thank the Web for bringing you in touch with such wonderful people.

This is a gratitude post to say thanks to one such person, and perhaps gloat a bit 😛

My friend Martin over at LikeTheSunShone and Through The Magic Door sent me a wonderful present last week, a package chock-full of Sherlockian heaven! So I just wanted to say, Martin, thank you! What a wonderful soul you are, I really will treasure these. 🙂

Jealous, the rest of you? Well good news is, Martin is selling a library of books online at Ebay-just checked them out myself, an excellent selection of writing books and other non-fiction. So if you want to go take a look, his user name is bragglebone. You’ll find some real gems there!

Enjoy the rest of your week y’all!

NM  🙂

Beckster got me tagged!


Becky tagged me last month for some awesome questions, and I was more than happy to answer them. I won’t be setting new questions or tagging anyone but feel free to answer the ones below if you wish. If you’re a bibliophile like Beckster I’m sure you’d want to and I would love to see your responses…

1.) Which book do you think should be adapted into a film that hasn’t been already?
The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova (the last time I checked Sony bought the rights to the movie but it’s still in production). If this doesn’t count, then I choose Company of Liars by Karen Maitland.

2.) Which classic are you too scared to read/keep putting off? (E.g. War and Peace.)
Alexandre Dumas’ Count of Monte Cristo(scared) and a few Dickens books(putting off for no real reason, really)

3.) Sam or Dean Winchester? (Supernatural)
Dean (He’s Jensen Ackles right?).

4.) Do you think the paperback will become extinct and be fully replaced with the Kindle?
I certainly hope not.

5.) Have you ever had an experience with the paranormal? E.g Ghosts, aliens etc.
Nope. Despite my former active efforts to look for them 😉

6.) Your least favourite genre to read?
Sci-fi or Romance

7.) Who’s biography would you consider reading?
Really want to read Portia de Rossi’s Unbearable Lightness

8.) The best birthday present you’ve ever had?
My brother took me to see Oasis live in Manchester for my 20th birthday(eons ago)

9.) Your opinion on 50 Shades of Grey? (Whether you have read it or not.)
Haven’t read it yet, but I want to. I don’t like giving opinions on books I haven’t attempted to read.

10.) Your favourite place to read? In bed.

11.) Which books from present day do you think has the potential to become a classic 50/100 years down the line?
I think it depends on what the socio-political scene would be like in 50-100 years time. If there are any books written now that reflect that scene or are considered relevant, then they will definitely be earmarked as ‘classics.’

NM 🙂

The value of undervalued things.


When Becky asked me last week, in reply to Legendary Ladies of Literature, whether I had known any of those women prior to working on that post I vaguely commented that I had heard of Sappho when I was younger. But the vague comment hid the flood of memories that came cascading into my mind as I thought about the first time I heard Sappho’s name. Now this might come as a shock to you but it was not in a book or in a documentary or even in school. I was introduced to her via a…kids’ cartoon.

Now granted there are many animated shows aimed at children which incorporate elements of classical history and ancient folklore which I suppose could be deemed educational in a sense but this cartoon was different. I will go so far as to say that it was probably my favourite show as a teen although nowadays I’m never eager to admit it. Why? Well because the show was not as famous as it should have been.

Years ago, at university, during the first tutorial of a semester, for orientation we were asked to introduce ourselves and state what our favourite show was (amongst other things) in an attempt to get to know one another. I mentioned this cartoon as being one of my favourites only to receive reactions of weird looks and furrowed brows. Nothing is worse than speaking about something you love only for it to be unappreciated because nobody knows what the hell you’re talking about. Just because something is not well-known, it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s not good.

For the record this cartoon I’m harping on about was called Histeria (yes, that is the correct spelling). It was a Warner Bros production, ran for only two years but was cancelled due to issues with the budget. Not surprisingly, it was created for the purposes of edutainment, quite similar to Terry Deary’s Horrible Histories series, but it didn’t seem to catch on in the viewership rankings.
In History and English I attribute a lot of what I know now to Histeria, rather than my lessons at school. And that is no exaggeration. When knowledge stays with you years after the lesson has ended – THAT’s real education.

Yes, the humour was juvenile but famous names and places stuck with me. In one memorable episode I found out who Emily Dickinson, Moliére , Basho and Sappho were. In the very same episode I learnt what a haiku was and got to know a bit more about the life of Mark Twain.
Aaaaaaand…guess what? You gotta love Youtube. I actually managed to find a clip from that very episode for you! Quality’s not very good but better than nothing. For the life of me I cannot understand why this show was not as popular as it should have been. Of course I’m known for being terribly bias…

What about you? Was there a not-so-famous show or movie that made an impact on you or your life? Or perhaps you read a really inspirational book but it never quite made it to Eat, Pray Love-status? Tell me, always love to hear from you…

NM   🙂

Why I shall be avoiding every author’s swansong from now on.


Reading-wise this hasn’t been a very good year for me. Even though my To-Be-Read List is considerably lighter than it was six months ago, 3 books especially, stand out for having proved big disappointments.

One was legitimately awful while the other two were not bad, but only proved dissatisfying because my expectations of them were so high. I think the disappointments were harder to take considering that all those three books were written by some of my favourite authors. (I had made my choices based on this fact)

One of them being Bram Stoker. As creator of one of the most famous horror novels ever, I thought it worth my while to give another one of his books my attention.

When I say that Lair Of The White Worm was ‘legitimately awful’, I say it with confidence only because I know I’m not being critical. While reading it, I came across far too many WTF moments. Apart from the errors and numerous inconsistencies, some of the scenes, imagery and subplots were so crazy and surreal that the story started to take on farcical proportions. I was left scratching my head as I read of supernatural kite-flying and weird hypnotic mind battles. Not what I expected from the author of Dracula. Even literary scholars have commented negatively on it, so I know I’m not the only one who feels this way about this novel.

However, I will admit, the same cannot be said for the OTHER two books that I read. Both works were critically acclaimed and one of them was highly recommended by people, whose opinions I rate very highly. Therefore I will not mention those two books and conclude that my disappointment with them stem from my own personal tastes rather than any flaws in the works themselves.

However, a strange coincidence revealed itself to me later on.

I’ll point out that all three books are very different in terms of genre, writing style and storylines etc. but they all happened to have one major thing in common: they were the last books these three authors had written before their deaths.  (Mindblown? No? Oh alright…)

On further investigation, I found out some pretty interesting information.

  •  The one unmentionable novel was not yet finished when the author suddenly passed away. The last few chapters were completed by another writer.
  • It is said that Bram Stoker died of syphilis in 1912. By the time he had finished Lair Of The White Worm in 1911, the disease had already reached the advanced stages. Mentally, Syphilis can be characterized by symptoms such as confusion, dementia, delirium and severe depression.

Well this certainly explains all the craziness in the novel!

In view of this new information, my sympathetic side was quick to pardon Mr. Stoker for this literary disaster. But this got me thinking. Should the background knowledge we have about an author affect the way we view their works? Should we allow sympathy to affect our judgement and objectivity? I know of people who refuse to even look at the book sleeve with the author’s bio when they purchase books, choosing to let the work stand on its own.

I’m the opposite however. I like reading up on the backgrounds and interests of the various writers whose works I read. It’s natural curiosity on my part to do so. But what do you think? If you read a book you thought was really bad but realised that the author was seriously ill when he/she wrote it, would you still be critical of it? Or do you think this information would help you to understand the story better?

Also have you ever thought about your WIP and wondered what would become of it if you ever passed away prematurely? A terribly morbid thought I know, but I mean, our stories are like our babies in a way. I assume you would not want it to be forgotten? Would you wish for someone to complete it and attempt to get it published?

And as for my reading luck, as sympathetic as I am towards authors and their personal sufferings, I am now dying to read a novel I know I will enjoy and these three books have now made me very superstitious. As a result I have since struck Dickens’ Mystery of Edwin Drood of my TBR list. No more literary swansongs for me, thank you very much.

NM 🙂

I’ve been tagged…twice!


Last month Nelle tagged me in a fun game of ’11 Questions’, and last week I was tagged again by August.  Special thanks to you ladies for choosing me.

The rules of the game are thus:

  1. Post the rules.
  2. In the same post, answer the questions.
  3. Create eleven new questions to ask eleven new participants.
  4. Tag those people and share links to their blogs in your post.
  5. Let them know you’ve tagged them.

 So I’ll start with NELLE’s questions first, and my answers.

1) Do you consider yourself a feminist? Depends. If I’m speaking to a misogynist, then the feminist in me comes out.

2) What is the silliest thing you will admit to doing? Falling for a pyramid scheme years ago and wasting quite a bit of money on it.

3) Favourite pudding. (I assume ‘pudding’ means any dessert in general) Chocolate Truffle Pie.

4) Your foremost vice. Errr, red wine?

5) Fastest driving speed with you at the wheel. I hate driving but I do remember once doing 100km/h on a 60 road. Ha ha!!!

6) Do you play a musical instrument? If so, please identify the instrument. Use to play recorder and guitar in school. Not anymore.

7) Barefoot or shoes? Barefoot…but with socks!

8) Secular or theocratic government? Definitely secular.

9) Would you sail the world alone? Definitely not. I have no idea how to sail.

10) One food you refuse to ever eat. Trotters! And anything that appears on Fear Factor.

11) Soup or stew? Soup. But if dumplings are involved then it’s stew.

 Go visit Nelle at http://nellewrites.net/

August’s questions

1. What did you eat for breakfast? Eggs on an English muffin with strawberry tea.

2. If you could re-live any day of your life, as often as you’d like, which would you choose? Oh dear, I can’t really think of one specific day. I’d like to think the best days of my life are yet to come.  😉

3. Of the books you’ve read recently, which is your favorite? Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

4. You have front row seats and back stage passes for any concert. Who’s on stage? Noel Gallagher, Jax Panik, Nicki Minaj, Goo Goo Dolls or Example. You choose…;)

5. Who’s the last person you hugged? My cat Deucalion.

6. What’s your favorite smell? Kentucky Fried Chicken! Or any food cooked with loads of oregano. LOVE OREGANO!

7. What’s your best bargain-hunting or money-saving tip? I believe this is a God-given talent. The ability to bargain-shop cannot be taught, sorry! Ha ha! Although if you want to spend less, create a shopping list of what you need and calculate what they will all cost. Then just take enough money for those items. That way you won’t buy unnecessary things. 🙂

8. What’s your funniest or strangest high school memory? I hated high school, so can’t really think of anything funny.

9. How do you feel about your birthday? Grrrrr…..that’s all I have to say!

10. What do you not miss about being younger? School lessons and horrible teachers!

11. What about you tends to surprise others? That I hold a Bachelors’ Degree in Archaeology and Classical Culture. Oh and that I’m currently writing a book!

Check out August’s blog: http://augustmclaughlin.wordpress.com/

*************************************************************

Okay, now it’s your turn! My questions are ready and I nominate the following people (who are not obligated in any way) to answer them:

Becky Day                       http://beckysblogs.wordpress.com/

Barb Froman                 http://barbfroman.wordpress.com/

Ricky-Lee Cranko        http://littlemisswednesday.wordpress.com/

Michelle Barber            http://loonyliterature.com/

Sharon Hughes             http://figmentsandimagination.wordpress.com/

Jennifer Neri                 http://jenniferneri.wordpress.com/

MJ Monaghan               http://mjmonaghan.wordpress.com/

Kelly Thompson           http://thompsonkelly.wordpress.com/

Katy Hulme                   http://storytellingnomad.wordpress.com/

Martin Shone               http://throughthemagicdoor.wordpress.com/

Widdershins                 http://widdershinsfirst.com/

These are my 11 Questions:

1.       If you attended Hogwarts, which house would you belong to, Hufflepuff, Gryffindor, Ravenclaw or Slytherin?

2.       I prefer Twitter to Facebook. Agree or Disagree?

3.        Romantic dinner at a fancy restaurant or staying in with pizza and a movie?

4.       If you were forced to marry ONE of the following men, who would you choose and why:

Ebenezer Scrooge, Severus Snape or Heathcliff?

And for the men, who would you marry:

Dolores UmbridgeMadame Bovary or Lindsay Lohan?

5.       Chocolate: white, milk or dark?

6.       Favourite Horror movie?

7.       If your personality were a colour, what colour would it be?

8.       What famous mystery would you most like to know the answer to? (Eg. The identity of Jack The Ripper or whether OJ was guilty.)

9.       If you were about to be executed(God forbid!) what would you choose as your last meal?

10.   Favourite CSI show: Las Vegas Original, New York or Miami?

11.   There are too many reality shows on TV. Agree or disagree?

So my tagged ones, hope you like my questions. The rest of you guys are free to answer any one of them if you wish because as always, I love to hear from you!

NM 🙂

Ps. the link feature on my dashboard is giving me problems, so I was forced to put up the entire URL’s for all the blogs. Sorry about that!

The ‘R’ word in Classic Literature


This post is a short one, posed more as a question to you, and which concerns a somewhat sensitive topic…

Now you’ve probably gathered how much I love the Classics. Anything pre-20th century is most likely to end up on my reading list.
However there is a trend I noticed amongst most Classic books that initially used to horrify me but which I now seem to take for granted because of its prevalence.
I’m talking about racism. Racial supremacy is all too inherent in the writings of Classic Literature. In some cases it’s blatant but mostly, it’s subtle. But it’s still noticeable.

What I want to know is, especially if you love the Classics: how do YOU react when you read, say a piece of fiction by a Victorian writer with clear racist undertones in the text? Does it upset you? Or do you take it with a pinch of salt?
As a person of colour myself, I used to be angry but now I find it quite amusing(in a disturbing sort of way). I always remind myself that writers are only human beings. And human beings are to a greater extent products of their environment. And any piece of fiction is a reflection of a writer’s thoughts and feelings. Therefore those feelings are reflective of the prevailing attitudes of the era in which the book was written. Since the Classics were written in times where racial supremacy was not only the norm but also accepted thinking, I tend to consider this when reading an old book.

I did wonder though, how others reacted to this. So, over to you, tell me your thoughts…

NM 🙂

Guest Blogger – Armand Rosamilia


Hey guys, today I’m proud to present my first ever guest blogger in the form of Horror writer Armand Rosamilia. Armand is currently on a blog tour to promote the latest book in his Dying Days series. There are chances to win a copy too, so check out the details at the end of this post. I hand you over now to Armand…

Product Placement

I remember, in my early twenties, subscribing to Writer’s Digest, and seeing so many ads from Jeep, Coke and others. But not just regular ads, these ran full-page and said something to the effect: “Jeep is a registered trademark. You can say car, auto, SUV, automobile, riding thing with wheels, motorized car – but don’t say Jeep or we’ll sue you.”

Author Armand Rosamilia

Now I actually don’t remember them saying they’d sue me, and I’ve used the word Jeep in a story or two in the last twenty+ years of writing.  I’ve also mentioned McDonalds, Dunkin Donuts, and a bunch of other restaurants, food items (a Diet Coke seems more realistic in a tale than ‘generic soda’, and everyone knows its cooler to say Budweiser than ‘generic beer’, right?), and used real places in my stories like hotels, cities, airlines, Styrofoam (they had an ad as well, now that I think of it)…

I’ve also been edited in several short stories over the years, where I’ve mentioned the protagonist and his whimsical sidekick were eating at Dairy Queen and talking, and the editor came back with ‘can’t use a real place, make something up’ or ‘make it a non-descript restaurant.’ Did I agree with that? Nah. No, if I’d said Satan worked the grill at Burger King and was cooking souls and making them anyway you ordered it, sure I could see a problem. I just never subscribed to the fictional world where you strip all reality out of it, no Hondas, no Walmart, no White Castle, and no Barbie Doll. Yet, I keep getting edited on the side of caution and told simply ‘you can’t use real things.’
But is that right, and is it realistic?

Not really. Think about writing a story with your hero using his new pair of Nike running shoes to get across town to the Texaco to buy Kleenex and a pack of Marlboros for his wife, before jogging to the Olive Garden to pick up dinner.
Is there anything wrong there? Nope, it’s benign product placement and it dips your tale in reality. A boring reality, but reality nevertheless.                                                                         Now, suppose our villain is using his Nike shoes – outfitted with laser beams and a saw-blade on the toes – and going down to Texaco to buy crack, which he wraps in Kleenex to transport in the Marlboro boxes, and takes his stash to Olive Garden, where he picks up dinner (even villains have to eat). Is that going to get you sued?
Actually, if you were Stephen King or James Patterson it might, although they wouldn’t even try to add that scenario in and their editor would have a cow.                                       But you and I? Nah. Unless your story goes viral, sells a ton of copies or someone makes a huge huff about it… actually, nah. No one would touch that one, and no company would waste their time with a lawsuit with some ‘unknown’ writer.
Would I write that? Never. In the case where I’ve added an evil company or product that directly affects things, I make it up myself. It’s fun that way.
But I’ll still get an editor in my future who insists I take out Cheetos (Cheesy Poofs, perhaps?) or Clorox or Hefty, even though it isn’t an evil item after world domination.
I once had an editor delete my throw-away line in a zombie flash fiction piece “You can’t leave, all the plants will die”… as if Bill Murray and the producers of the movie Stripes would be upset I stole it from them, or sue her and have her anthology removed forcibly from the store shelves.

But that’s another story all together…

Armand Rosamilia

* * * * *
I’m actually running a Giveaway for my Dying Days series of zombie books, although you might not have gotten that from the blog post… anyway…

Want to know more about the Dying Days series? Want to win free eBooks and maybe print books of them? My contest is simple: e-mail me at armandrosamilia@gmail.com with DYING DAYS in the subject line and I’ll enter you into the daily giveaway… also, post a comment here and you get another chance… follow my blog at http://armandrosamilia.com for yet another chance, and friend me on Twitter (@ArmandAuthor) and simply post DYING DAYS to me, and you’ll get another shot… nice and easy, right? If I get enough people joining in the giveaway there will be a print book given away that day!

Dying Days series information can be found here: http://armandrosamilia.com/dying-days-series/

Having to deal with the evolution of the English language.


There is no shortage of writing advice out there. Everywhere you look, there are writers, bloggers and teachers advocating proper grammar, proper spelling, use of punctuation etc.etc.

Now as you know, I love classic English literature. As a result, I tend to write in a very similar style. However, I HAVE written a few stories set in modern times- my head is not always in the past, surprisingly. The thing is that when I am working on a piece of modern (or is it contemporary?) fiction, I am sometimes faced with a dilemma: normal people, the general population that is, very rarely apply the rules of the English language anymore. What I’m trying to say is, very few people actually speak properly.

Hence the phrase I don’t know has become “dunno”, I’m going to has become “I’m gonna” and the word BECAUSE in its entirety has ceased to be. Instead it has been shortened to “cause’, “coz” or “cuz” (Cuz that’s how it is, dawg!).

So the issue here is this: maybe it’s just me but I sometimes feel guilty to employ the above slang in modern dialogue.

courtesy of cartoonstock.com

With so much emphasis placed on writing good English, I sometimes feel the need to have my characters speaking correctly, even if it’s against my greater judgment.

Let’s take for example, a conversation between two teenagers. I don’t know about you but I know very few teenagers who actually speak proper English day to day, and even then, they might only save it for the classroom or when conversing with adults, giving speeches etc. So when writing their dialogue, would it make sense to have them sound like they’ve just stepped out of a time machine that has just arrived from the 19th century?

Can we balance good English with modern realism?

And because I don’t read much modern fiction, I am struggling to find examples of where authors have their characters speaking in this informal manner. I can’t remember ever reading a character saying “I dunno” or “Coz I said so” or my personal favourite, the double negative: “I ain’t done nothing.” Yet people in movies and in real life often talk like this.

For those of you who are sticklers for the proper use of our beloved language, would you be annoyed if you had to read dialogue like this? You might tolerate it if it was only one character, who spoke like this, but what if a whole novel was about a group of kids and the dialogue throughout the book was written in this fashion?

Like I said, I don’t read many modern contemporary novels and the few that I’ve read, pretty much stick to the rules of good English. I’m sure, however, that there are plenty of books out there that employ this form of colloquialism. If you know any such books, let me know won’t you? If they are written by famous authors, maybe I won’t feel so guilty…

Otherwise any other thoughts, as you know, are most welcome.   🙂

The LIEBSTER BLOG AWARD


Happy New Years y’all!!!!!

I trust that you’ve had fun over the festive season. I certainly have and am looking forward to a great year in 2012. I could not have thought of a better way to start the new blogging year than with another blogging award. My good friend Becky awarded me the Liebster Blog Award last month. She’s always singing my praises, is benevolent Becky, so there’s no words to fully describe my gratitude to her except to say, a big, hearty THANK YOU!!
And if you love books, which I assume you do (and if you don’t, what on earth’s wrong with you?!), Becky is THE best book reviewer in the blogosphere. That is my opinion of course but I happen to rate my opinion very highly so go check her out at Blogs-of –a-bookaholic.

Obviously, as with all blogging awards, it is required that I pass this award on to others.
The rules are thus:

Upon receiving your Liebster award, you should:

1. Thank your Liebster Blog Award presenter on your blog.
2. Link back to the blogger who presented the award to you.
3. Copy and paste the blog award on your blog.
4. Present the Liebster Blog Award to 5 blogs of 200 followers or less who you feel deserve to be noticed. (some say just 3 or more blogs of less than 200 followers each)
5. Let them know they have been chosen, by leaving a comment at their blog.

It’s been awhile since my Versatile Blogger Award and I’ve met so many great bloggers since then. Of these, I’ve chosen my top 5, in no particular order:

Martin Shone
Even if his short stories weren’t so darn entertaining, I would still give Martin this award just for being a Sherlockian like me. In my opinion, to be considered truly awesome, you HAVE to be an Arthur Conan Doyle fan, so he definitely meets the requirements. He’s also a great poet so check him out here.

Nelle
I don’t mean to play favourites but Nelle is definitely one of my favourite commenters here on the Writers Bloq. An intelligent writer, who’s life experiences and musings I really enjoy reading over at her own blog Ramblings of a Daft Writer.

Happiness Stan Lives here
This is actually a cooking blog but still one of my favourites. If you love good food, love to cook and have a sense of humour, go here right now!

Chris
Chris is a young writer to watch out for. He’s a prolific blogger with excellent insights on the writing process. Check him out at Write to Perfect.

Jennifer Neri
Jennifer’s musings about her writing experiences hits very close to home. Her down-to-earth style and honesty is refreshing and will appeal to writers. Go and pay her a visit here.

Once again thank you to the Great Beckster (sorry Becky, that’s your nickname from now on 🙂 ) for my Liebster. And to the bloggers mentioned above, go on now, and spread the love. You know you want to.

NM 🙂