DAY 25 – Favourite book you read in school


The one book that definitely made the biggest impression on me in school was To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee.
It has the distinction of being the first book ever to have such an emotional impact on me. I was fuming at the incidences of racism; I felt genuine sympathy for Atticus Finch; I think I cried a little when he shot that dog and I wanted to scream in protest at Mayella Ewell and beat her with a crowbar!

As a South African teenager the issues of racism really hit home and I marveled at the irony of reading an American setbook in school, whose major themes mirrored the very issues we were dealing with in our then fledgling democracy.
To Sir, With Love was another great setbook that also dealt with racism in society and in relationships yet Mockingbird seemed all the more impressive in terms of its messages and its characters.

Set in the American South in 1930’s, Atticus is a literary hero who cannot be easily forgotten. The decision to tell the story from his daughter Scout’s point of view was an excellent one on Lee’s part. She’s such an endearing character, and her innocent but blunt point of view made all the injustices in the book seem greater.

Even the most cynical and stony-hearted person will be moved by this story. I recently picked up Mockingbird to read it for a second time. Being the sensitive little softie that I am, I couldn’t bring myself to do it. Not because I would find it boring the second time around, but because I could still remember the storyline very clearly and all the emotions it stirred up within me the first time I read it. Only a true classic can accomplish this.

I feel every person on the planet should read To Kill a Mockingbird at least once in their life, so if you haven’t yet, do yourself a favour and get a copy of this book.

DAY 14 – Book whose main character you want to marry


I really would like to pick Sherlock Holmes because I’d be lying if I said I didn’t have a crush on him. But I won’t pick him, not because I’ve spoken about him to death in this Book Challenge, but also because we all know what an emotionally unavailable misanthrope he is, with not the highest regard for the ‘fairer’ sex. Basically he isn’t marriage material.

So here goes my search for the most suitable fictional suitor (can I declare myself a polygamist and marry all of them? Is that cheating?).

Here are the candidates:

Atticus Finch – A truly wonderful man who imparts excellent wisdom to his motherless children and is not afraid to stand up for what he believes in. (Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird)

Robert Langdon – I have a thing for intellectually smart men, so give me a break. (Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code)

Mr. George Knightley – Personally I think he’s way better than Mr. Darcy, whom every girl seems to be in love with for some reason. Frankly they can all have Darcy, I’d be perfectly happy with Knightley thank you very much! (Jane Austen’s Emma)

Dr. Henry Jekyll – Okay I know this is a strange one but I did think he was quite nice, that is before he had a mid-life crisis, went a bit crazy on us, drank some poison and became a jerk and ruined in his life in the process. Idiot.
(Robert Louise Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)

Owen Archer – A dishy medieval spy/sleuth (so what if he has only one eye?). (Candace Robb’s The Lady Chapel and other Owen Archer mysteries)

And finally…

John Thornton.
Even better than Mr. Knightley methinks, but I just had one problem here. I wasn’t sure if my choosing Thornton here was based on Richard Armitage’s portrayal of him in the BBC series of North and South in 2004.

Richard Armitage with Daniela Denby-Ashe in North And South

I will now admit that a couple of years ago I had no idea who Elizabeth Gaskell was and only became aware of her after watching this series which I absolutely loved. Armitage was so darn gorgeous as Thornton that I am now beginning to wonder if I would feel the same way about the character if I had not seen the series. Note that the same can be said about Knightley (Jeremy Northam might have influenced this one) but thankfully not about Langdon.
I think Tom Hanks is kind of goofy and not at all how I pictured the Harvard symbologist to be. It’s a miracle how Hanks’ face doesn’t even come into my head when I read Dan Brown!

So would I feel the same about Thornton from reading the book without the beautiful Armitage invading my brain?
I’m not entirely sure yet, but one thing is certain. I thought he was a perfect match for Margaret Hale, therefore he’s more than good enough for me.

So based on this, I say John Thornton is the winner! Yay!

NM 🙂